August 18, 2019

5 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend

5 Dance Performances to See in N.Y.C. This Weekend


Our guide to dance performances happening this weekend and in the week ahead.

BALLET FESTIVAL at the Joyce Theater (Aug. 16, 8 p.m.; Aug. 17, 2 and 8 p.m.; Aug. 18, 2 p.m.). Over the past couple of weeks, artists associated with Britain’s Royal Ballet have been taking turns curating programs for the Joyce’s annual midsummer gift to balletomanes. The fourth and final one belongs to the adventurous principal dancer Edward Watson. His lineup will begin with four short works — all duets and solos — by the choreographers Wayne McGregor, James Alsop, Laila Diallo and Javier de Frutos; the pieces will be performed by Watson, his Royal Ballet colleague Sarah Lamb and the former New York City Ballet dancer Robert Fairchild. Following the intermission, the three will come together in Arthur Pita’s “Cristaux” and will be joined by the City Ballet principal Maria Kowroski.
212-242-0800, joyce.org

BATTERY DANCE FESTIVAL at Robert J. Wagner Jr. Park and the Schimmel Center at Pace University (Aug. 16, 7 p.m.; Aug. 17, 6 p.m.). This annual international festival at the tip of Manhattan offers one more free outdoor performance on Friday. Participants include troupes from Austria and Curaçao and several artists based in the United States, including Battery Dance, the company founded by the festival’s organizer, Jonathan Hollander. Battery Dance appears again for the concluding, ticketed performance at the Schimmel Center on Saturday, joined by the Austrian and Curaçaon companies, as well as one from Lithuania and a young dancer from Iraq.
batterydance.org/battery-dance-festival

[Read about the events that our other critics have chosen for the week ahead.]

GUANGZHOU BALLET at the David H. Koch Theater (Aug. 17, 8 p.m.; Aug. 18, 1 p.m.). Founded in 1993, this classical company boasts an eclectic repertory comprising Western staples and contemporary Chinese ballets. The program coming to New York includes both. “Carmina Burana,” set to the famous 20th-century composition by Carl Orff and choreographed by the Chinese dance maker Jiang Qi, is paired with “Goddess of the Luo River,” a romantic ballet inspired by a mythical tale, choreographed by the Canadian artist Peter Quanz to music by Du Mingxin.
212-496-0600, davidhkochtheater.com

JACOB’S PILLOW DANCE FESTIVAL in Becket, Mass. (through Aug. 25). Performances by the Martha Graham Dance Company and the ballerina Sara Mearns, who is branching out into modern and contemporary dance from her usual perch on point shoes, continue through the weekend. On Wednesday, the Boston Ballet visits with a program comprising excerpts from a recent work by William Forsythe set to an eclectic collection of songs; two dances by the Russian choreographer Leonid Yakobson; and one from the company’s resident choreographer, Jorma Elo, set to Bach’s Cello Suites. Coinciding with these performances, the always engaging Urban Bush Women presents “Walking With ’Trane,” a tribute to John Coltrane that takes inspiration from his life and music.
413-243-0745, jacobspillow.org

WENDY WHELAN at Rumsey Playfield (Aug. 21, 8 p.m.). In the 2016 documentary “Restless Creature,” which followed Whelan, a beloved ballerina, as she struggled through injury near the start of her retirement, she wonders, “Knowing how much I can work in the future is a question that will have to be answered.” Now we know, and the answer is a lot. Recently appointed associate artistic director of New York City Ballet and fresh off a premiere at Jacob’s Pillow, Whelan comes to the free outdoor SummerStage series to perform an excerpt from a work in progress by the choreographer Francesca Harper. She is proceeded by the spoken word artist Marc Bamuthi Joseph and followed by a screening of “Restless Creature.”
cityparksfoundation.org/summerstage



Source link

About The Author

World Media News delivers breaking news, headlines and top stories from business, politics, entertainment and more in the US and worldwide

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Translate »